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Should the Service Desk be included in the Service Catalogue

By ITIL® from Experience©

The elements to consider are:

  1. The type of Service Catalogue discussed and;
  2. If the organization offers a Service Desk service.

When the Catalogue discussed is a User1 Service Catalogue, at minimum it must contain information on how to contact the Service Desk. Thus, the Service Desk should be mentioned regardless if the organization considers the Service Desk a function2 or a service.

When the Catalogue discussed is referring to a Customer3 Service Catalogue then, the Service Desk should be included when the organization offers a Service Desk "service." In other words, Customers can "order/buy" the service of a Service Desk instead of setting up their own function. On the other hand, when the Service Desk is a means-to-an-end thus, is included/bundled as part of the end-to-end service it should not be included (see Is the Service Desk a service).

However, it is important to realize that even though I.T. may not offer the Service Desk service to its Business Customers, the Service Desk can still be a service offered internally within I.T. to operational groups like the Application Development group. In this case, the Service Desk service should at least be included in the Service Portfolio4 as it ensures that it is taken into consideration during strategy discussions and decisions which may affect its fit-for-purpose.5


Related:



Category:
ITIL Process > Service Catalogue Management
ITIL Process > Service Desk


1. User: A person who uses the IT service on a day-to-day basis. Users are distinct from customers, as some customers do not use the IT service directly. Source: ITIL® glossary and abbreviations, English, 2011, http://www.itil-officialsite.com/InternationalActivities/TranslatedGlossaries.aspx
2. Function: A team or group of people and the tools or other resources they use to carry out one or more processes or activities – for example, the service desk. Source: ITIL® glossary and abbreviations, English, 2011, http://www.itil-officialsite.com/InternationalActivities/TranslatedGlossaries.aspx
3. Customer: Someone who buys goods or services. The customer of an IT service provider is the person or group who defines and agrees the service level targets. The term is also sometimes used informally to mean user – for example, ‘This is a customer-focused organization.’ Source: ITIL® glossary and abbreviations, English, 2011, http://www.itil-officialsite.com/InternationalActivities/TranslatedGlossaries.aspx
4. Service Portfolio: (ITIL Service Strategy) The complete set of services that is managed by a service provider. The service portfolio is used to manage the entire lifecycle of all services, and includes three categories: service pipeline (proposed or in development), service catalogue (live or available for deployment), and retired services. Source: ITIL® glossary and abbreviations, English, 2011, http://www.itil-officialsite.com/InternationalActivities/TranslatedGlossaries.aspx
5. Fit for purpose: (ITIL Service Strategy) The ability to meet an agreed level of utility. Fit for purpose is also used informally to describe a process, configuration item, IT service etc. that is capable of meeting its objectives or service levels. Being fit for purpose requires suitable design, implementation, control and maintenance. Source: ITIL® glossary and abbreviations, English, 2011, http://www.itil-officialsite.com/InternationalActivities/TranslatedGlossaries.aspx


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